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Healthy people are also at risk for heart disease

June 20, 2011

But the more unhealthy you are, the greater your risk. As an adult, it’s well worth the time to update your knowledge about coronary artery disease. Sure, you can learn how much blockage it takes in a coronary artery before you get a myocardial infarction. But unless you’re a cardiologist, you just need to know what to do about it.

Having a heart attack is not a one-time deal. Even if you survive this number one cause of death in men and women, you’re stuck with a chronic disease that puts you into a high-risk group for life. You’ll never be the same. Here’s some new facts:

  • Aspirin doesn’t lower your risk of having a first heart attack.
  • Slim people on good diets and regular exercise have less but still some risk.
  • Quitting smoking drops the risk within weeks. Less than a half-pack also lowers it.
  • 2 drinks a day only helps if you’re already a drinker. It’s not better to drink red wine.
  • Recent studies show extreme exercise – eg marathons – may hurt heart health.
  • Sedentary lifestyle is a number one risk factor for heart disease.
  • Genetics is big – siblings and parents with early heart attacks are a warning sign.
  • Just 20 pounds of extra weight increases the risk.

Warning signs! Knowing the warning signs saves lives, maybe yours. If someone has signs of a heart attack, call 911. Don’t drive yourself to the hospital. Paramedics can start emergency care as soon as they arrive.

What else is important?

  • Check your blood pressure whenever you get the chance. A surprising number of middle age men are going  around with high blood pressure and don’t know it. Not getting treatment or skipping medications increases the chance of a heart attack.
  • Get your glucose level checked even if you’re not overweight. Mild diabetes easily goes undiagnosed. Controlling blood sugar lowers risk of heart disease.
  • Caffeine and stress don’t increase the risk for high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Heart health is always about lifestyle –  diet, exercise, moderation, etc. Other posts on this site here cover those and offer many links.
  • It’s good to get an unbiased cardiologist’s second opinion before a doctor does a procedure on your heart. Not everything has been shown to make a significant difference. Insist on being fully informed, and make sure your investment of time, pain, and money is worth it. Even if it’s a 911 call, you can get a second opinion later.
  • Click here to test your knowledge!

 

More links:

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. August 7, 2013 12:52 am

    Admiring the commitment you put into your website and in depth information you present.
    It’s great to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t the same old rehashed material.

    Excellent read! I’ve saved your site and I’m including your RSS
    feeds to my Google account.

  2. December 25, 2012 6:46 am

    I don’t know if it’s just me or if everybody else encountering issues with your blog.

    It seems like some of the written text in your posts are
    running off the screen. Can someone else please comment and let me know if this is happening to them as well?
    This might be a problem with my web browser because I’ve had this happen previously. Thank you

  3. mark maginn permalink
    June 20, 2011 2:56 pm

    Good post, Joel. Nicely informative and straight forward. I think most men, and women, in mid life don’t think about these issues unless forced to. Everyone should follow the information and advice in this post. Good job.

    • June 20, 2011 8:56 pm

      Thanks, Mark. It’s always good to look at this topic again especially when there are updates. As advanced as medicine may be, there is always controversy and new findings coming up.

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  1. Lifestyle for a Healthy Heart | Find Me A Cure

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